Emile Zile and Philip Brophy in conversation

Join Emile Zile and Philip Brophy for a conversational and unmoderated exchange as they select, screen and discuss each other’s video work. Both artists move horizontally between visual art, filmmaking and performance, working beyond the confines of strict categorisation. Their methods and tools are post-cinematic: scavenging and re-presenting the moving image material that surrounds them.

11 September 2017, 6.30pm
Free entry, bookings requested

Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Federation Square Melbourne

https://www.acmi.net.au/events/emile-zile-and-philip-brophy/

Emile Zile and Sven Lütticken in conversation

Within the framework of the exhibition “Liquid Cooled: new works by Emile Zile”, LIMA organises a public screening and discussion night. The artist Emile Zile and art historian and critic Sven Lütticken will talk about Zile’s work within the context of the LIMA Collection – ranging from early gems from the seventies (Douglas Davis, Dan Graham) to Zile’s current body of work. Performance on television, social media and the performativity of the mass media will be recurrent themes.

Entrance: € 7,50 / 5,-
Free entrance with: Cineville pass
Language: English

LIMA
Arie Biemondstraat 111
1054 PD Amsterdam
The Netherlands
+31(0)20 389 20 30
http://www.li-ma.nl

https://www.facebook.com/events/356797314716082

This programme is part of the exhibition Liquid Cooled: new works by Emile Zile
LIMA is proud to present its first exhibition of new works by the Australian artist Emile Zile. Liquid Cooled will present prints, video works and a performance by the artist who currently has a residency at the Rijksakademie voor Beeldende Kunsten.

Performance at Castrum Peregrini

Memory Machine II – A series of exhibitions, debates, performances & publications on cultural memory & identity, initiated by Castrum Peregrini Amsterdam.

Exhibition & public program

Things to Remember
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27 February – 25 March

With works by Mehraneh Atashi, Dayna Casey, Amie Dicke, Nickel van Duijvenboden, DNK Ensemble, Maria Guggenbichler with Margit de Sad, Romy A. More, Egbert Alejandro Martina and others, Jonas Lund, Antoine Viviani, Emile Zile. Curated by Radna Rumping

How are digital media, endless storage space and new ways of communicating shaping the way we capture, share and retrieve our personal memories? The things we want to remember, do they still fit in a shoebox or are they floating around somewhere in ‘the cloud’ amongst the thousands of e-mails and images that our external memory can contain nowadays?

Saturday 27 February 2016, 16.00 – 17.30

Free entrance. A conversation with Amie Dicke, Simultaneous/Synchronous (Song) Performance DNK Ensemble (Koen Nutters & Seamus Cater), Performance Emile Zile

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Mining the Cloud

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Interval Projects
Mining the Cloud
A series of desktop documentaries
Thursday May 26, 7pm
Schoolhouse Studios
81 Rupert St. Collingwood
$15

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Interval presents Mining the Cloud: a series of desktop documentaries by local and international artists.

Charting the multitude of the Internet through the desktop interface, these films and performances record the virtual as real, traversing landscapes that fall outside our visual circuits. From abandoned virtual realities to electronic dumping grounds of Ghana, this is the detritus of late capitalism in a time of rapid technological change.

The desktop documentary is an emerging practice drawing from the disciplines of ethnography, archaeology and contemporary art. Using desktop browsers as both lens and edit suite, these films and performances excavate artefacts from under the “cloud”. These artists respond to the human impulse to navigate, archive, interpret and ultimately control the world around us.

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Lettres du Voyant by Louis Henderson (UK)
Lettres du Voyant is a documentary-fiction about spiritism and technology in contemporary Ghana that attempts to uncover some truths about a mysterious practice called “Sakawa” – internet scams mixed with voodoo magic. Tracing back the scammers’ stories to the times of Ghanaian independence, the film proposes Sakawa as a form of anti-neocolonial resistance.

All that is Solid by Louis Henderson (UK)
A technographic study of e-recycling and neo-colonial mining filmed in the Agbogbloshie electronic waste ground in Accra and illegal gold mines of Ghana. The video constructs a mise-en-abyme as critique in order to dispel the capitalist myth of the immateriality of new technology – thus revealing the mineral weight with which the Cloud is grounded to its earthly origins.

Utopia 1.0: Post ­Neo ­Futurist ­Capitalism in 3D! by Annie Berman (US)
A first­-person expedition to Second Life, the once thriving virtual 3D online world, in search of what remains. Given the invitation to come build anything imaginable, what is it that we chose to create?

A performance by Emile Zile (AU)
Emile Zile’s performances use new-age healing apps, YouTube monologues and algorithmic portraiture to create audio-visual meditations on augmented spirituality and networked representations of the self.

James Cameron’s Avatar at Channels Festival

James Cameron’s Avatar feature length performance September 19 2015

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In the Epoch of the Near and Far invites contemporary audiences to reframe discussions on digital media. Flipping the much talked-about suggestion that emerging technological forms distort reality on it’s head, the exhibition proposes a relationship which sees our physical and digital lives mutually support and influence each other. Comprising the work of six Australian and international digital and performance artists, In the Epoch of the Near and Far is running as part of the Channels Festival for Australian video art.

The exhibition opens September 19 with a performance from Emile Zile, the Australian born Netherlands based artist whose work is informed by his own navigation of a technologically mediated reality. Featured artist Keith Deverell will also run an Artist in Conversation session on September 24 alongside art historian Dr. Grace McQuilten and exhibition curator Amelia Winata.

In the Epoch of the Near and Far runs from the 18-27 of September at Grey Gardens Projects in Fitzroy and features work from:

Petra Cortright (USA)
Heath Franco (AUS)
Marian Tubbs (AUS)
Emile Zile (AUS/NL)
Keith Deverell (UK/AUS)
Aaron Christopher Rees (AUS)

Residency at MES56, Jogjakarta Indonesia.

As part of the ‘Put Up a Signal’ Australia-Indonesia program I will be hosted at MES56 from 11-22 November to create new work and exhibit.

http://putupasignal.info/artist

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Nayla, Wok the Rock and me practising our wrestling press-kit team pose, 2011.

Thanks to Bus Gallery Melbourne, Mes 56 and Asialink Arts.

Reschooling: workshop at Museum of Contemporary Art Sydney

Emile Zile leads a collaborative workshop on (mis)using the internet for the purpose of art/lulz. Through a range of participatory exercises Zile will demonstrate techniques to detourn everyday social media and search engines in dynamic performative ways that offer new perspectives on these ready-to-hand tools.

#cavemanVJ #expandedhomecinema #officeworksavantgarde #postitnotebrut

With his history of performances that engage with popular culture and consumer technology Emile Zile recently premiered OMG_Sisyphus. The Greek mythology of Sisyphus, a tale of burden and absurdity, is used as a prop on which to enact a contemporary performance situation: being on YouTube. The performance happens in the midst of laptops, amplifiers, digital cameras, projectors and a heavy looking stone that the artist carries in from outside. In recent performances of OMG_Sisyphus at (Open Archive Melbourne, 30 November 2011, Palais Paradiso Amsterdam 16 February 2012) Zile enacts a humorously calculated switch. In his treatment we begin to understand that the laptop/webcam is now a rock, or vice versa. Its physical presence, weight, and texture become entwined in a passage of worship, as the ubiquitous Apple product is now something more equivalent to a Chinese scholar stone (Gongshi). Throughout the whole performance it is as if through some application of post-production what we should be seeing as a computer (the adored gateway to online audiences) is now a small volcanic boulder. Simultaneous slips between live action and published content begin, as Zile sits staring at the rock we imagine him staring at his computer, alone in a room while addressing an imagined YouTube audience. In doing so the actual live audience sitting in the gallery space is distanced, even denied.

At some points in the piece we are made to feel the joys of web 2.0 publishing, light relaxation muzak plays, we are all connected by technology. But the gallery space begins to fall out of step as the artist struggles against what appears to be self-doubt and loneliness. The rock remains motionless on a small table under lamplight. Is real life different to projected life? Maybe it used to be. Zile seems to suggest a new friction is built in this crossover rather than a seamless merger. Whilst various elements of the performance are online, the crux of this work hinges on being present live in the gallery space – where multiple facets of contemporary being are felt and fired simultaneously. As it happens we are pointed toward a space where states of alienation, corporation and intense connectivity collide into a state of indivisibility.

– Ry David Bradley, February 2012

Saturday October 4, 10am – 1pm.
Capacity is limited and bookings can be made through the MCA at http://www.mca.com.au/events/reschool-emile-zile-internet/

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Liquid Architecture tour 2014

Screened: new performance in Melbourne, Brisbane, Sydney and Singapore.

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Liquid Architecture is an Australian organisation for events, exhibitions, performances and situations of the world’s leading artists working with sound.

Once a “sense-specific” festival, interested in listening and the depth of individual sound perception, Liquid Architecture is broadening its focus of concern to engage the social, cultural, political, economic as well as aesthetic frameworks in which sound takes place. Now in its 15th year, Liquid Architecture’s 2014 festival program brings together work from across a range of disciplines to audiences in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Perth and Singapore. Marking the new direction driven by curators Joel Stern and Danni Zuvela is the festival’s focus on social and conceptual questions, signalling a more sustained engagement with the discourse, sound and practices of contemporary art. This is a move into the investigation of the audible as an expression of the myriad, sometimes inaudible forces enframing, encoding, describing and producing what we hear – whether that is considered music, sound, or noise.

Talks program: public speaking, private thinking, social listening
http://www.liquidarchitecture.org.au/program/stutterances/

“Stop talking about talks” – Christof Migone

Christof Migone gives an artist talk, no a TALK ARTIST
Alessandro Bosetti demonstrates MASK MIRROR
New Waver loads up THE KING OF PPT
Ur 1st Luv propose A SOUND INVESTMENT
Johannes Kreidler adresses THIS TULIP OF WHICH I AM SPEAKING AND WHICH I REPLACE IN SPEAKING
Kusum Normoyle is SILT (Screaming In Lecture Theatre)
Emile Zile performs SCREENED
Makiko Yamamoto is UTTERLY SILENT, UTTER SILENCE, UTTERLY SOMETHING, OR UTTER SOMETHING, THINKING THINKING, UTTERLY LISTENING, UTTERLY UMMM.

Capacity limited to 250 people

RSVP http://www.eventbrite.com.au/o/liquid-architecture-6942295259

In partnership with NGV and ABC Radio National’s Creative Audio Unit.

Further performances of Screened will occur during the Liquid Architecture tour in Brisbane on October 1 at IMA, Sydney October 5 at UNSW Art and Design (COFA), Singapore October 10 at LaSalle College. Full details at http://www.liquidarchitecture.org.au/program/

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I follow Yoko and Yoko follows me at MCA Sydney

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An invitation arrived to respond to Yoko Ono’s instructional film scripts. The suggestion of a film. Film as it exists in a proposition, an invitation, a request to think. ‘Visualise peace’ Yoko says. Visualise film. #summerofyoko

Q. Which Yoko piece(s) are you responding to and how?

A. I am taking Yoko Ono’s current day Twitter feed as an unrequited instruction set. I follow Yoko Ono and Yoko Ono follows me.

Q. If we imagine a spectrum in which predetermined structures, scores, instructions sit at one end and  spontaneity, intuition, improvisation at the other – where does your work sit in that spectrum? Or is that spectrum faulty to begin with?

A. I have a structure within the walls of the MCA. The technology of the image projection. The design of the seats. We have voice, light, human will. I feel energised by unbridled human energy in tightly controlled environments.

Postscript. I don’t believe in freedom in art. It can only be given by imposing a structure or rule set upon it. There is no freedom. There is no restraint.

New performance
‘I follow Yoko and Yoko follows me’
Museum of Contemporary Art Sydney
6 February 2014, 6:00-9:00pm

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http://www.mca.com.au/news/2014/01/31/interpreting-yoko-onos-film-scores/

http://otherfilm.org/ifollowyoko/

Jessie Scott on Larry Emdur’s Suit (2002) and the death of analog television broadcasting in Australia.

There’s Emile, part Edward Scissor Hands/part Wu Tang Clan, ably filling the frame with studied awkwardness; not just in a video, On Television. The cognitive dissonance of seeing this for the first time was astonishing: it wasn’t just any TV – it was ultimate prime time chew-cud: The Price is Right. There he is cracking wise with plastic fantastic Larry, playing the game, not giving away the joke, carefully treading the line between performance and reality. A line that, in the wake of the 90s talk show phenomenon, and before reality TVs total dominion, had suddenly become very blurred. It was prescient – a death knell to hackish old analogue, sent from the past to the future, sincere, hysterical and knowing.

Full article available at http://televisionsproject.org/larryemdur/.

Watch Larry Emdur’s Suit at https://vimeo.com/24577604

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