Alaska Projects performance Sydney

essena_promo

Everyday Machines #1
Sunday October 16 2016
Alaska Projects [William St], performances from 6:30pm
73-75 William St Darlinghurst

Alaska Projects in collaboration with Tom Smith presents Everyday Machines. This performance series brings together artists exploring the tyranny and poetics of everyday machines through performance.

EMILE ZILE
JANNAH QUILL

GET TO WORK

EMILE ZILE
Performance of identity. Mental collapse. Marketing move. Within the YouTube monologue of ex-Social Media star Essena O’Neill we hear an earnest call to arms to defend reality and remove oneself from the fracturing of the self as enabled by social media. Emile Zile uses this monologue (and subsequent call for donations) as a present day ‘everyman/everywoman’; Essena’s yearning for authenticity is our yearning for a life removed from pretence, consumption and image-management. Yet all is not what it seems and through an intertextual performative commentary on the monologue Zile descends into the Egoic hall of mirrors that we navigate online.
https://emilezile.com/

JANNAH QUILL
Jannah Quill will perform several text to speech translations simultaneously, and feed the resulting audio through pitch correction software. Jannah’s performance attempts to correct the uncorrectable, to extract the musical from randomised language, and to generate the new from the digitally banal.
http://www.jannahquill.com/


Tè will perform their recent work 100_PERCENT_HITS. 100_PERCENT_HITS continues an investigation into the form and the production of the ‘pop song.’ The idea of the ‘radio-ready’ track—increasingly defined by standardised production, duration and audio quality—is here further condensed, examining what traces remain in the re-contextualisation of musical forms. 100_PERCENT_HITS is a performance that explores the generic—both as a standard and a site for the production of novelty.
http://negativespaces.net/100-percent-hits/

GET TO WORK
In their new work ‘Racey Texts’ Get to Work explore texting and sexting as modes of communication that result in intimate/impersonal experiences. The work further explores how cultural identity is represented through ringtones, emojis and phone paraphernalia.
http://www.get-to-work.com/

Jessie Scott on Larry Emdur’s Suit (2002) and the death of analog television broadcasting in Australia.

There’s Emile, part Edward Scissor Hands/part Wu Tang Clan, ably filling the frame with studied awkwardness; not just in a video, On Television. The cognitive dissonance of seeing this for the first time was astonishing: it wasn’t just any TV – it was ultimate prime time chew-cud: The Price is Right. There he is cracking wise with plastic fantastic Larry, playing the game, not giving away the joke, carefully treading the line between performance and reality. A line that, in the wake of the 90s talk show phenomenon, and before reality TVs total dominion, had suddenly become very blurred. It was prescient – a death knell to hackish old analogue, sent from the past to the future, sincere, hysterical and knowing.

Full article available at http://televisionsproject.org/larryemdur/.

Watch Larry Emdur’s Suit at https://vimeo.com/24577604

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Jack screening at IDFA / Amsterdam Art Weekend

Amsterdam Art Weekend at IDFA
30 Nov 2PM-4PM, Cinema Tuchinski Amsterdam
http://www.idfa.nl/industry/tags/project.aspx?id=7ced2b08-a13f-46bc-97a3-702739bf3074

This screening will be a 2K DCP version in surround sound.

Melanie Bonajo – ‘Pee on Presidents’, courtesy the artist
Muzi Quawson – ‘Doll Parts’, courtesy Annet Gelink Gallery
Ursula Mayer – ‘Gonda’, courtesy Juliette Jongma, Amsterdam
Emile Zile – ‘Jack’, courtesy the artist

IDFA and the Amsterdam Art Weekend collaborate during the programme Paradocs, the festival’s line-up devoted to video art. Films submitted by galleries participating in this year’s Amsterdam Art Weekend, De Rijksakademie and De Ateliers, will be screened at the Tuschinski cinema.

10_JACK_EmileZile logo_idfa_share

Video Art in the Internet Era. Video Letter #2: Emile Zile

‘As part of our critical forum, Video Art in the Internet Era, we asked a series of artists, curators and video brains to send us “video letters” responding to the provocation of our critical forum: how can video artists orient themselves towards or against the complex backdrop of networked technology, smart phones and prosumers of our current world?
Riffing on the YouTube genre of “unboxing”, Emile Zile performed a “boxing” of some usurped analogue technology, the detritus of many a media artists studio.’

http://www.channelsfestival.net.au/program/forum-video-art-in-the-internet-era/